WandaVision: All Of Monica Rambeau’s Powers, According To The Comics

The show WandaVision has been setting up the gradual empowerment of Monica Rambeau over the course of the series, and in episode 7, her extraordinary powers and abilities finally manifested.  Monica’s powers appear to be in line with those she has in the Marvel comic books.

Monica Rambeau has a long history in the comics, first as Captain Marvel, and then later Photon and Spectrum. It remains to be seen what name she takes in the MCU, but it’s clear she’s going to be a major force in the movies and television series for a long time to come.

Monica Rambeau is one of the most powerful female superheroes in Marvel Comics, and she has been since her debut in Spider-Man Annual #16 back in October 1982. She was co-created by writer Roger Stern and artist John Romita Jr. and one of the primary powers they gave her is the ability to transform into any form of energy on the electromagnetic spectrum.

This means she can literally become microwaves or radio waves. In WandaVision, she could conceivably become a television signal.

She can do more than just transform into energy. Monica can also manipulate and control any form of electromagnetic energy. This makes her one of the most powerful characters in the Marvel universe and her powerset is similar in many respects to the powers of Captain Marvel.

Monica can manipulate gamma rays, X-rays, infrared light, and more. When she absorbs the energy, she takes on all of its properties, which gives her a staggering dynamic range of abilities.

Monica gained her superpowers through an accident. She was exposed to electromagnetic radiation after trying to prevent an experimental weapon from being activated in her hometown of New Orleans.

This made her instantly visible to the public, but one of her greatest powers is to become invisible. Since Monica can control any energy on the electromagnetic spectrum, she can control visible light and thus make herself invisible to people and any method of detection.

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