Gilmore Girls: Things That Make No Sense About Lorelai’s Home

For seven seasons, Gilmore Girls fans have gotten to know the ins and outs of Lorelai and Rory Gilmore’s home. The ladies have spent many movie nights in that living room, late-night conversations in their bedrooms, and plenty of cups of coffee shared in the kitchen. But the more fans rewatch the series, the more they question the Gilmore home.

From the sheer size of the home to the number of bedrooms, Lorelai and Rory’s home isn’t your typical house. In fact, it’s more of a funhouse when viewers point out all of its oddities.

Starting with the biggest question surrounding the Gilmore home: how does a house of that size only have two bedrooms? By looking at the front of the house, it looks like there’s plenty of room upstairs for more than one bedroom and a bathroom. A second bedroom could have easily been added to the upstairs layout. As for Rory’s bedroom, well, that’s an entirely separate subject.

As aforementioned, with an upstairs that’s large enough to fit two bedrooms, why was Rory’s bedroom downstairs, attached to the kitchen, no less! Rory’s bedroom could have been a dining room originally that the girls transformed into a bedroom for some privacy.

But it’s still strange to have a bedroom that’s attached to the kitchen. It’s also odd that Lorelai was okay with her daughter sleeping downstairs. The two are so incredibly close, it seems a tad dangerous to have your daughter on the main floor away from the master.

Lorelai bought her house in 1995 after working at the Independence Inn since she was a teenager. It’s assumed that Lorelai had a trust fund from her grandmother, which kicked in when she was 25 (like Rory). Without a trust fund, it seems far-fetch that Lorelai was able to afford the down payment of a house this size in Connecticut. Homes in New England can become quite expensive, and for a single mother who wasn’t gaining child support from Christopher, it seems unlikely that she was able to buy such a home.

Related Articles

Responses